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  • Esmeraldo
    Points:30
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    Long chopsticks

    It's a lazy Sunday morning and I wanted to ask a small historical question that definitely does *not* have any earth-shattering consequences. I was re-watching an episode from "War of Three Kingdoms" earlier this week (episode 12) and came across a scene in which a character (Cao Cao) is eating a simple meal at home alone. 

     

    He appears to be using really long chopsticks. Much longer than ones in common use today. At first I thought it might be a trick of cinema perspective, but it was consistent from different camera angles. This series has been very historically accurate with details such as weapons of war, and I got to wondering if chopsticks back then, late Han Dynasty, were simply longer than they are now. 

    1 week agoin Culture-Nanjing
    Answers(5) Comments(0)
  • Wafaa
    Points:3
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    it's an intresting thing, we never see the Long Chopstick before
    21 hours ago
  • Miraluz
    Points:26
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    usually, the tools is a new thing for us, we Foreigners are not used to using long Chopsticks,
    1 day ago
  • MuhammadAamir
    Points:26
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    Thought this was an interesting question. Quick search through some not very authoritative Chinese sources on the web seems to suggest that chopsticks coming out of early archaeological digs were about the same length or even shorter than the most common sort today. Wonder if they have some specific set in mind that inspired the ones in shot?
    5 days ago
  • Adina
    Points:27
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    My individual eating chopsticks are 23 cm long, whereas my cooking/serving chopsticks are 30 cm long. I've seen longer cooking chopsticks at use in restaurant kitchens, used for stirring things in really big woks. Later today or tomorrow I'll go to a supermarket and have a look at the chopsticks section to see how uniform the size of the individual eating ones are.
    6 days ago
  • Aqeel
    Points:1
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    questions like this are what makes this forum interesting, at least to me. Relatedly, I've been watching the historical drama Nirvana in Fire and there's a wonderful scene where two martial arts spar with chopsticks. They're seated at a birthday celebration and one challenges the other by catapulting her chopsticks across the room where the other party manages not only to deflect them but sends them back her way. They then fly into the middle of the room and use the chopsticks as swords of a sort. Chopsticks as lethal weapon? I can see it. (BTW, in another post I was questioning whether immersion through watching dramas was really as effective for language-learning as it's said to be. Well, after watching another few episodes, I take back what I said. I am really getting some phrases and words down by hearing them used repeatedly in this drama. It's also helping my listening comprehension as I often stop to translate what I'm hearing (I mean into Pinyin as I'm watching with English subtitles, of course).) I'll now have to check out War of Three Kingdoms.
    1 week ago

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